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Thursday, August 8, 2013

Tutorial part 6. New Look 6963.


New Look 6963

 Hello Everyone

This tutorial series has covered the making of New Look 6963, shirt/blouse version C.

I've made it before, so I know that it acutally works well.  It has a collar, back facing and front facing.

Today we are up to the last stage - the buttonholes.

I always have a bit of a thing with buttonholes - I don't have an automatic buttonhole on my machine, and have to rely on what is called "operator skill".

If you have an automatic buttonholer, you will find my lines and measurements unnecessary - you will just need to mark where your buttonhole starts.

Some of you may do hand buttonholes, in which case work them the way you normally do.

In your pattern you will find a piece called "buttonhole guide".  It does both the long and short versions of this shirt.


Version C only uses 4 buttonholes, so mark these. I mark the top, then I assess what size I need to make the buttonhole.

Next, I make a sample of my buttonhole size - I make a small strip that is interfaced - much like a facing:

 

I tend to do this by eye now - quite a few guides say allow an 1/8 inch, but this is too much for small buttons.  The amount you need also depends on the depth of the button. I just have a feel now for how much I need:

 So: measuring what I think is my buttonhole depth and width.

(Please make sure you put a dot for the buttonhole that is on the centre front line.  You can see I have actually drawn mine.  You may not need to if you  have an automatic buttonholer - you will just need your placement point.  I need vertical and diagonal lines because I have to do my buttonholes using zig zag either side of the line and a bar tack either end).


Here are my lines:


And now for a test run:



The buttonhole is okay so I shall proceed.  

Before I do my "real" buttonholes, I always check the bobbin - there is nothing worse than running out half way through a buttonhole.  It all has to be undone:




 Now we need to get rid of all those ends.  Don't snip the ends, but thread them through to the back and fasten off there.  Otherwise the ends can start unravelling:


Having made our buttonholes (and I do hope you have an automatic buttonholer - it makes life so much easier), now we have to open them.  Do this very carefully down the centre of the buttonhole.  Use your stitch unpicker.  Place a pin just before the bar tacks at the end of the buttonhole so that you don't accidentally cut through the end.  Go very carefully and slowly down to the end, then turn the buttonhole around and open up to the other end:


Next step is to sew on the buttonholes.  I tend to mark them by lining up my facings and then placing a pin through the buttonhole:




And then marking the corresponding dot on the CF line of the button side of the garment:


Sew on your buttons and voila:


We are done.  The blouse is finished except for tacking down the facing at the front yoke seam:


If you use a disappearing marker like mine, it is water soluble (some are air soluble).  I know I can use this marker on this fabric.  Always test your markers, because not all of them come out, and not all fabrics are suitable.  I use a squirt bottle:


Magic, marks gone.  Then iron your blouse once more (I am assuming you press as you sew) :  Lightly iron your r revers in place. 


 And there we are. Finished.  And if you think the blouse does not look straight at the hem (it is, I measured both sides to check this) it is actually my arthritic old dummy - she is adjustable, but she is so old now she does not adjust back and her shoulders are uneven - so giving the uneven hem (like a scoliosis). But she is much  better than nothing and has served me well since poor student days, then mortgage days.  Funnily enough, I'm starting to get just as rickety, so maybe she will serve me well in the future!


Tomorrow I will finish this series with a few hints for you before you rush off and start this blouse :)

Sarah Liz :)



18 comments:

  1. Love your pink blouse. I have enjoyed watching it come together. Nice outcome.

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  2. Love your blouse, it's a beautiful shade of pink. I like the way you did the sleeve cuffs. It's a very nice finish.

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    1. Thank you Kathy. The cuffs are a lovely touch :)

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  3. That color is going to look very good on you. Good idea to use a needle as a stop when opening the buttonhole!

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    1. Thank you Elise. Some people use other ways of opening buttonholes as well.

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  4. The blouse look great, and quick results. I hat making the opening on buttonholes, so tricky.

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    1. Thank you Louise - I think everyone has reservations about opening buttonholes:)

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  5. Great Tute Sarah Liz, It's Very Helpful Having You Do Step By Step And Seeing How You Interpret N Procee.With. Pattern.. I Have Auto Buttonhole Maker, But I Don't Quite Like The Look, But Now I Learnt How To Make One From Scratch From You In Case I Want To! Thanks!

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    1. Thank you Far. I guess we all work differently with patterns. I'll work through a buttonhole in more detail next week.

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  6. Cute blouse, and nice buttonhole tutorial. My "new" machine has an auto buttonhole-hurray...

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    1. Thank you - and lucky you with the auto buttonhole - does it work well?

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  7. This is the part that scares me. Thanks for the buttonhole tutorial!!!

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    1. I'll talk more about buttonholes next week to see if we can get over the block.

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  8. Sarah Liz, Thank you for this tutorial series. Would you please consider adding a "tutorial" tag/label to these posts so that I can find them again? Thanks! Oh and I always wonder whether there's a way to put the buttonholes in much earlier in the process. Of course you'd need to have already tried the pattern so that you'd be certain about the button placement. But if you did it this way, and (unfortunately) made a mess of it, you'd only need to redo the bodice piece.

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    1. Certainly you could sew the side seams and insert the sleeves last. But I think the facing should go on - facings can also be tricky, and they have to lie correctly. I guess you could try sewing the facing first and then doing the collar section after - I don't worry too much about buttonholes anymore.

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    2. PS I've labelled the tutorials.

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  9. Love your pink blouse .. It is so pretty.Great job. Thank you for sharing.

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