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Monday, September 23, 2013

Scary September Butterick 5821 - a fail and a win....

Every once in a while you realise that you are still style - stuck making dungarees, which most people leave behind as toddlers.  Butterick 5821 was my wake up style moment.



Butterick 5821

While I hate the jacket - I never liked these jackets when they were first in fashion, I did think the skirt and trousers might make a nice relaxed garment for around the house.  The front is faced while the back has elastic.  The waist is supposed to sit one inch below the natural waist.

Now I have always suspected that faced trousers and skirts will not work on me because of my high tummy and high hips - you need larger hips to hold a faced garment up - basic structural principle.

I should also have looked at the photo more closely and the design sketch - see how the trousers curve out - I suspect quite full legs and hips are supposed to fill these out.

And I was right:


Well, this cut is certainly relaxed.  But rather baggy and not quite what I had in mind.  Downright frumpy, in fact.  And these were size 8 with a little more for my mid section - which I have calculated correctly.

It gets worse:



While I have certainly mastered the crotch shape- (I redrew the crotch shape on these pants to suit meboth front and back are okay in these trousers) the look overall is downright baggy, saggy and dowdy.  Even for house pants.

I am seeing quite a few baggy pants more this shape on young girls, but really, I don't like it on me.


And the side view was less than flattering as well.  I do have elastic  waist  trousers for comfy wear, and they do not look as ugly as this.

But dutifully, like all good blogging sewists, I went off and remade the pattern when I should have said quite firmly and loudly - this style is not for me.

That's what you would do in a shop with RTW that does not suit you,  but no, we sewists are determined to fight it out to the bitter end.

So, off I went to spend quite some time redrawing the pattern - raising the rise (yes, I have at lest worked out I have a high rise) and took in the sides of the pants and took out some of the leg curve - and that meant redrawing the pocket bags and side front as well.


Then I went and re-toiled the pants:


(I used up parts of my husband's old shirts for this muslin, that is why they stop at mid calf).

Okay, slightly better, not quite so voluminous around the hip.  But not the look I want at all.

(I ran out of old shirt backs here and used a small remant of calico for the one half of this toile).

Seriously clam digger pants.  I do not like them.  This style is not for me....


When I want some paddling pants, I'll know what to make, but for now, I think I will pass on Butterick 5821.

So, not a winner, but I haven't made a wadder either.  Nor will I clutter up my cupboard with another me made that will come in useful one day and will never be worn.  Mind you, that can happen with RTW as well.

But I have learnt lots of things with this exercise:

 1/  Sewing time management - working consistently during the week in small blocks really moves a project along - so I will now keep steadily doing a little bit every day .

2/.  I have mastered both the crotch shape I need and the relationship of the rise to my body shape and crotch depth.

and.....

I have worked out my style - neat, elegant,nicely cut, chic styles.

NOW TO WORK  OUT HOW TO MAKE THEM!

That will be part of the Garment a Month challenge, starting on October 1st - details to come later this week.  
 

26 comments:

  1. I admire your perseverance with all these trouser muslins! You're right about defining your style after a few failed projects, too bad it takes much longer than trying things on in a changeroom

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    1. Yes, it takes a bit of trial and error, and a few hits and misses to work all this out - but worth it, I think :)

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  2. Thank you SarahLiz for doing all the hard work for me. Since your shape and mine is very similar I won't bother with that pattern.

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    1. I agree Kathy - these would not suit you at all :)

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  3. Working out your style is a huge accomplishment.

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  4. I wouldn't call that a frumpy look at all, in fact the little crop top showing off your midriff is quite sex-ay! Looking good! I wish I could work out what my own style is :)

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    1. Yes, but I wouldn't be seen in anything like this :) I think you have an eclectic style, but a natural base:)

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  5. there's nothing worse than getting a bad pattern, by the time I disect my patterns they are custom made lol! back 25 yrs ago I could cut a pattern, whip up something with no problems but now days patterns have changed so much or either I'm shrinking lol!
    Helen

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    1. Yes, a lot of patterns seem bad nowadays, but I think when I was younger I just thought I looked good in whatever I made, whether I did or not :)

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  6. I'm often tempted to try new pants patterns, but I chicken out and return to my tnt pattern,

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    1. I don't blame you Faye - sometimes working with what works is the best way to go...

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  7. "But dutifully, like all good blogging sewists, I went off and remade the pattern when I should have said quite firmly and loudly - this style is not for me. That's what you would do in a shop with RTW that does not suit you, but no, we sewists are determined to fight it out to the bitter end."

    This is so true. We will wrestle with a muslin until the muslin grows feet and walks away from us. For me, I think that I can do better than RTW and so I have to keep trying.

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    1. Yes, some muslins are better off walking away, lol's. I agree, the worst me made can be better than some RTW. And each time you learn something :)

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  8. have you tried Style Arc patterns for pants? I'm having good luck with them. I made a pair of their BARB pants and they fit pretty nicely. Have to use a stretch woven fabric, though. (They recommend Bengaline.)

    Anne at the Sewing Engineer blog did a post about the Barb pant - and she has sewn up a LOT of Style Arc patterns: http://clothingengineer.com/

    :-) Chris

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    1. Hi Chris, no I haven't. People seem to be very happy with Style Arc - I'll have to try one of their patterns.

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  9. Proud that you learned so much from this pattern.. and your out look is fantastic.. Admire you!!!
    Happy sewing.

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    1. Thank you Judith - it pays to keep positive :)

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  10. You are way to slim to hide away in this style of pants! But what a great learning curve you had. I take my hat off to you, because I have never tried to sew a pair of pants ... yet!!!

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    1. Hi Judith, thank you, yes, I did feel swamped :). I wonder if you will take the plunge one day, Judith, with pants? There may come a time.... :)

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    2. Well luckily for me, Sarah Liz, pant wearing season is behind me for another 9 months - into skirts now for summer which I just love to make - no crotch measurements or rise issues to be seen with a good old skirt ... J

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    3. Yes, the "always next year" approach works well - I've been saying that for years about some styles of garments as well :)

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  11. I would ditch these pants if I were you too! Your trim figure shouldn't be drowning in any garment! You have lovely style so stick with what works. We are always learning something new aren't we?

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    1. Hi Margo - yes, it's a continual learning process :) I'm glad you agree that ditching them was the way to go :)

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  12. Definitely not your style. That being said, the voluminous look is fine for camping on the beach and in a drapy fabric. Using cotton or cotton blends for your muslin makes the pants look frumpy. If made in a linen or rayon blend, they would drape with style.

    I need to write my own pants post...my Soho pants almost made it into the trash but I saved them by going down 2 sizes in the legs.

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    1. Hi Mary - I agree, these are just the sort of thing you would wear camping/beach so I know what to make when I do. I can't wait to see how you salvaged your pants - it seems that all the main commercial pattern companies make voluminous legs.

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