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Saturday, February 21, 2015

Trial Trousers McCalls 6711.


 I've finally finished these trousers in between bouts of sinusitis and tax paperwork. The plan was to make a simple pant that was fairly straight up and down in order to get some idea of what fits me well.  I will then be able to use the resulting altered pattern as a sloper for other  pants.

I used the pants from McCalls 6711:



 These are a simple pant with front and back darts.  I have worked out that with my tummy curve a dart is needed.  There are front pockets - a plus. The pants are faced and have a back zip.  Back zips annoy me - too much fiddling around to get there, I'm an in and out in a hurry type of dresser.  I also like a waistband as it helps to hold things up on me - I have very small hips at 33 1/2 inches and faced garments just tend to fall down on me.

I cut size 8 outside leg,  size 6 inner leg and size 14 waist and trued the in between area.  The crotch curve was size 8.  The pockets were cut to the size 12 line.  The pattern did not have a pocket stay, just a pocket bag, so I drafted a stay.
 


As I also like to have a bit of give when I sit, I added strips of elastic at the back You will find pictures of this process below.

I also added a small extension in the back of the pant and the waistband (I split it so it had a CB seam)  in case I need to let them out - you will often  this arrangement in men's pants - again, pictures below.


I have previously made a calico (muslin) of the alterations which can be found here.

From these I discovered that I need to add extra at the back crotch curve, not scoop it out more as is so often recommended :

 The inside black line is the original cutting line. The red line is the alteration I made on the calico - that was the seam (yes, it was a very small seam allowance!)  The outside black line is the new cutting line - I added a seam allowance to the new stitching line.

After these alterations, a test pant was needed.  I used a cheap cotton poplin out of my stash.  It doesn't have any give, or flop, or drape of any sort, so that pants are a little stiff, but quite wearable as a casual garment.

I'll show you the inside details first:

The waistband alteration extension and the pants extension.  You can also see the elastic at the sides.



I stretched the elastic and stitched it in place with three rows of stitching.  The amount of elastic needed and the amount of tension needed is always a bit hit and miss with me - I often have to redo the elastic as the first round is often too tight or too loose!


 This is what it looks like on the outside:


And my zipper finish - I used a false fly for this - I don't need the bulk of fly shields - and with a nylon zip you don't need these.  This was before ironing!  ...   


And these are what the pants look like on me - for reasons of modesty you are only getting the bottom half of my body is these photos :)

As you can probably tell, I am a very fine build - you can't see any ribs at all!  I have very very slim legs, and if I fit the pants more than this, they will not flatter me - I prefer semi-fitted pants. I do not have those lovely curvy thighs and bottom  that fill out trousers and look very feminine - I have  long bambi limbs, straight down from the hips.  Pants will always big a little loose over the front crotch area as well because of my below hips slimness.  I'd prefer to keep things this way :)

And it seems to be they way things are with slim, boyish figures:



One more photo to close, and then it's time here to do some ironing and get some dinner:

Do have a lovely weekend wherever you are,

Sarah Liz :)


42 comments:

  1. You are getting there! Last week I saw this tutorial for expanding the waist while keeping a slim fit at the hips: http://curvysewingcollective.com/tutorial-how-to-expand-the-waist-on-a-pattern/ Did you ever try anything similar?

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    1. Thank you Marianne. I will have to pop over to that site to find out what they do before I know if I have done anything similar. Thanks for the link.

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  2. A new TNT? Here's hoping, looking lovely so far.

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  3. The trial looks pretty good Sarah!

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  4. Sarahliz, you have done a wonderful job with the fit of your pants.. And, I love, love that shirt.

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    1. Thank you - isn't it lovely. I like that shirt too - I'm quite tempted to buy the book but I think it is a basic that could be copied :)

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  5. It is always interesting to read the process of your work. This particular type of elastic insertion is a nice way to get the fitted look with an elastic waist? Nice. Yes, I agree with the others, this pair is looking very good.

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    1. Thank you . Yes, you could insert elastic in a full waistband this way, but I have used a fitted waistband so that the front is flat and only added elastic as the back. Just a bit - so there is a bit of give when sitting.

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  6. Pants fitting is the hardest of them all and you are doing a great job. Think of your legs as the legs of a thoroughbred ! Long , slim and elegant.

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    1. Thank you Janine - I like the thoroughbred analogy :)

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  7. Your trial version looks good to me.

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  8. They look fantastic. What a great fit !

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  9. Wow, I need to pay attention more. I have this pattern and didn't notice it contained a pair of pants - despite the biggest image is of the model wearing hot pink!

    I like the elastic at the back - very clever. I think some ease is needed for the comfort of sitting. I have full quads and relatively smaller hamstrings. The combination leads to bagginess in the back. Meh. What we make is far better than what we'd ever be able to find ready-to-wear. Strut your stuff! =)

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    1. Thank you L - it's funny what the eye doesn't see sometimes :).

      Yes, elastic in the back may not be the hottest look around, but it does help stop the back bagginess brilliantly - also helps to allow ease to accommodate the tummy :)

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  10. Your trial pair turned out rather nicely.

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  11. These are looking very good, love the leg width.

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    1. Thank you Sharon - I agree, not too narrow, not too wide.

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  12. Your pants look good. I like your elastic waist treatment too, it certainly helps to keep things where they belong.

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    1. Thank you Kathy - yes, elastic is a very good secret weapon - good for those elastic waistlines we develop as well :)

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  13. I am in awe of your ability to alter a pattern to fit, Sarah Liz. I have no idea how you knew what to do, and am fascinated how beautifully the pants turned out. The elastic at the back is a really good idea which I should also copy. My pants efforts are always hit and miss; I need to do this too.

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    1. Thank you Patricia - I've been working on pants now for quite some years and have gradually worked things out. There were many muslins and moments, I can assure you :)

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  14. Well well done these are looking good. You have found a style that suits your slender frame and your fit adjustments all work. I admire all the effort you have made to get a TNT trouser pattern,

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  15. Love to see the finished pants. You did a good job and it suits you nicely :)

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  16. These are some great looking pants! Great job!

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  17. Interesting to read your progress on these. They are looking good already. How wide is your overlock (serge) stitch? I really need mine that wide!! x

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    1. Thank you Dawn - the overlock stitch is the widest my machine will do, 0.5 mm according to the manual. I have just measured it and it is actually closer to 0;6 mm. I used a Bernina 700D.

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    2. Thank you! I've just got a plate to get a wider stitch. Mine was only 3mm x

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  18. I have this pattern and it is great to see them made up! Looking great Liz!!

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  19. These turned out very nicely. I have a stick-figure build with little to no curves so I understand feeling comfortable in clothes. At least you have a pant pattern you can make your own!

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    1. Thank you Annie - yes, we stick figures have our own challenges just as the curvier girls have their challenges.

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