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Showing posts from March, 2017

The end of Greenery, with McCall's skirt M5336

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 I finally got to the end of my 3 metre x 260 cm piece of green quilting cotton - I just managed to squeeze out this skirt. It's hard to see from the picture, but this skirt actually has it's kick pleat at the front - if you look closely you can just about see it. I used McCall's M5336, a long OOP pattern:  The line drawing will give you a good idea of the pleat/split detail at the front of the skirt: I modified the pattern top suit my shape - which basically meant pulling out a pattern that had been previously modified and shaping this skirt to match it.  Sort of 8 hips, 14 waist.  And I added slanted pockets at the sides of the front of the skirt: The pleat sits at the front like this: The pleat did not finish nicely inside - per courtesy of the pattern instructions, so next time I make this I shall finish this area quite differently.  It was sort of overlock, cut seam, and fold hem, leaving a raw edge at the top of the

Continuing in Green, Butterick Jacket B5701.

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I did get rather a lot of this green quilt backing cotton - 3 metres X 260cms, @ $3.00 per metre! - but thought it would be about the right price to experiment with. So far, a dress (great pattern) ,   trousers (great pattern)  , and now this simply, boxy, jacket. Which I love, even though it is square and boxy, and some would say unflattering. Not to my eyes, it's just a relaxed, wearable, classic shape as far as I am concerned. The pattern I used was Butterick B5701, a See and Sew version of a jacket that was also in the main jacket section at 4 times the price : I really liked the straight lines on this jacket, and the seaming and top stitching.  I also wanted to try an unlined jacket, because tailored, fully lined jackets, which I can do reasonably well, are just not what I tend to wear much of the year in a sub tropical climate.  The fabrics recommended were line, poplin, lightweight denim, and lightweight broadcloth.  My cheap old cotton is a  bit sti

The long awaited Lisette Pant - Butterick 6331.

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Finally, the Lisette pant that some of you have been patiently waiting for me to blog as some of you  have the pattern and want to know my thoughts.  I'm using the green craft fabric that I bought in quite a large quantity (it was $3.00 per metre for 260 wide - a quilt backing cotton) from Spotlight last year.  It's perfect for these pants, and and I love them! Back to the pant, not my feelings about this pair. For those of you who do not know what pattern I am referring to above, it is Butterick 6331. The Lisette pant is a classic tapered pant with some elements of jean styling  in that it has side pockets and back yoke. Now, a few of you are wanting to know if this pattern works out nicely.  This is very hard to answer, in that it worked for me, but it may not work for you.  For a start, it has a straight waistband, and this might not work well for those of you who need a contoured waistband. I am a straight figure type, and have very slim hips and legs, so a

Back Blogging with A Back Blog of McCalls 7466.

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 I'm back blogging, and of course, I have a back log of blogs to blog (try saying that 10 times extremely quickly).  I needed to take a break from blogging - it can get quite tiring publishing a blog regularly for three years.  A well earned blog holiday was needed. I also hit a bit of a low energy patch which even affected my desire to sew. What I do in those patches is make wearable muslins.  That way, I can keep in practice, try a new pattern and maybe get a decent garment to wear or at the very least find a pattern that is worth revisiting. I try and find bits of fabric that are very cheap at Spotlight in order to make wearable muslins. This was one such piece - backing cotton for quilt making.  It was very wide (about 260 cms) and as it was only $3.00 per metre, I purchased three metres.  My original intent was to use it instead of muslin or calico for unwearable muslins (toiles) but I liked the fabric enough that I decided to risk garments.   Although I have to sa